“One Team, Endless Dreams” Opening Day Activity

Collaboration, Creativity, Culture Building, Growth Mindset, Motivation

Inspired by Daniel Pink’s What’s Your Sentence video and activity I had completed as an MAET student, we created an activity for our opening day keynote. We asked our staff to reflect upon the unique talents that they each bring to the team that make us strong and successful.

Then we sent our staff off to create their individual sentences. Many of our staff members hung them on the walls of their classrooms and offices as a reminder of why they are here and how they want to be remembered. At the end of the year, we shared with the staff this video and asked them to reflect upon how they had lived up to that sentence or how that sentence had changed for them over the course of the past school year.

 

 

 

Maker Camp: Building a Maker Mindset

Collaboration, Growth Mindset, Maker Camp, Maker Mindset, Maker Movement, MakerEd, MakerSpace, Motivation

Everyone is a Maker.

At Maker Camp, we explicitly introduced something we called a “Maker Mindset”. We decided that it was important to highlight different parts of a Maker Mindset every week of Maker Camp. Maker Mindset introduced and reinforced qualities and the kind of growth mindset that our students needed to recognize in themselves while making and creating.

Our first Maker Mindset introduced the belief that everyone can be a maker. We knew many of the students came to Maker Camp because they had an interest in making, but we worked on projects that involved a wide variety of topics and skills that could easily have become overwhelming, frustrating and lead to feelings of defeat. We wanted students to understand that they all brought unique qualities with them that made them each unique makers. Creativity, problem solving, techy skills that students commonly see themselves lacking can all be practiced and developed- they are not a prerequisite to making.

Making and creating- along with the ownership and pride in that experience- is inherently part of being human. We have been doing it since the beginning.

As a result, we included our “Super Maker” project to kick off Maker Camp. This project prompted students to create a popsicle stick superhero of themselves, write their name and some of their making strengths. We posted them on the wall and asked students to use the wall for collaboration and support. If you wanted to make a movie, but you did not consider yourself a very good artist- go to the Super Maker wall and find someone who lists drawing or animation as one of their strengths. Ask that person for help or if they would like to collaborate on a project. This was a great way to connect our campers and reinforce the Maker Mindset belief that everyone is a Maker.

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Maker Camp: Diving In

Creativity, Failure, Innovation, Maker Camp, Maker Movement, MakerEd, MakerSpace, Motivation, STEM

So let’s begin this first post on Maker Camp with a camp tradition:

The spooky campfire ghost story.

One day, two crazy educators bravely decided to host something called Maker Camp with only two weeks notice. So they cautiously entered into the abandoned school (Ok, it was summertime. But if you’ve ever been in school after hours by yourself, you know what I mean- it’s enough to give you the goosebumps). They entered with no budget, a cry for volunteer help, over 100 students and families registered and the hopes and dreams of inspiring and encouraging creativity, communication, collaboration and critical thinking in students, staff and the greater community.

To see how this story ends, follow my posts about our Maker Camp experience. These posts are written reflectively quite a bit later than I would have preferred but better to reflect late than never.

Still fresh and new in my role as a Technology Integration Specialist with my district, I was looking for a way to use the summer to continue to build relationships and bring awareness to technology integration and instructional design to our staff, students and community. Cue my colleague, Beth, whose mutual interest and passion for the Maker movement and its impact on education became our initial bond. We began looking for ways to introduce making and the Maker movement to our students, staff and community. But of course this was about more than just the Maker Movement. Our district, as are many others, is working hard to shift towards more project based learning and active learning pedagogies along with technology integration. The 2016 Horizon report identifies accelerating trends in technology adoption in education and Maker Spaces, a shift to deeper learning approaches like project based learning, a shift from students as consumers to creators and a rise in STEAM learning as key trends and important developments in K-12 and higher education within the next 1-5 years.


In my
experience though, systematic change is often slow-moving and complex. Transformations in pedagogy like that don’t happen overnight. Which is frustrating for someone who is passionate about instructional design and technology. I just want to jump into classrooms and shout LET’S DO THIS!”. But it was important for me to pause and recognize that successful change is about feeling and not about thinking. I can tell teachers about the Maker Movement and get them thinking about how it could impact their classrooms, but that will never live up to them seeing that student that they have been struggling to engage all year suddenly engaged and enthusiastic and creating SOMETHING. That’s feeling and that is why we do what we do in the end. And that is what gives us the motivation to change.

“The deepest problem for us is not technology, not teaching, nor school bureaucracies, it’s the limits of our own thinking.” – Sylvia Libow Martinez

 

Motivation

MAET Year 2, Motivation, Praise

demotivation(1)De-motivational Poster

We discussed motivation today and its effects on education. Intrinsic, extrinsic, Maslow’s hierarchy of needs and even de-motivation. We also discussed the concept of flow and what that looks like in the classroom. We discussed how behavior is predictable up to a certain point in terms of motivation. We also looked at the three elements of motivation- autonomy, mastery and purpose- as described by Daniel Pink. We then had some fun with the negatives effects of extrinsic motivation and praise by creating de-motivational posters!